2001 Elantra - check engine light

Discussion in 'Hyundai Elantra / Lantra' started by jan820, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. jan820

    jan820 Guest

    My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    ago. The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    got it home. She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    light would go out. Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    accelerate and the check engine light is on. Then it will sort of
    surge and go into gear and drive normally. the check engine light
    still goes off when she restarts the car. As far as I know, there is
    no stalling or rough idling problem.
    I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    she seems to think so.
    Any ideas?
     
    jan820, Jan 12, 2009
    #1
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  2. jan820

    Voyager Guest

    jan820 wrote:
    > My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    > ago. The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    > got it home. She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    > light would go out. Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    > accelerate and the check engine light is on. Then it will sort of
    > surge and go into gear and drive normally. the check engine light
    > still goes off when she restarts the car. As far as I know, there is
    > no stalling or rough idling problem.
    > I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    > she seems to think so.
    > Any ideas?


    Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes. This isn't rocket
    science.
     
    Voyager, Jan 12, 2009
    #2
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  3. jan820

    jan820 Guest

    On Jan 11, 9:58 pm, Voyager <> wrote:
    > jan820 wrote:
    > > My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    > > ago.  The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    > > got it home.  She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    > > light would go out.  Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    > > accelerate and the check engine light is on.  Then it will sort of
    > > surge and go into gear and drive normally.  the check engine light
    > > still goes off when she restarts the car.  As far as I know, there is
    > > no stalling or rough idling problem.
    > > I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    > > she seems to think so.
    > > Any ideas?

    >
    > Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes.  This isn't rocket
    > science.


    It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.
     
    jan820, Jan 12, 2009
    #3
  4. jan820

    Leythos Guest

    In article <11546c33-5d7a-4ab0-8a54-
    >, says...
    > On Jan 11, 9:58 pm, Voyager <> wrote:
    > > jan820 wrote:
    > > > My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    > > > ago.  The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    > > > got it home.  She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    > > > light would go out.  Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    > > > accelerate and the check engine light is on.  Then it will sort of
    > > > surge and go into gear and drive normally.  the check engine light
    > > > still goes off when she restarts the car.  As far as I know, there is
    > > > no stalling or rough idling problem.
    > > > I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    > > > she seems to think so.
    > > > Any ideas?

    > >
    > > Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes.  This isn't rocket
    > > science.

    >
    > It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    > posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    > purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    > who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.
    >


    Actually, going to the dealer or to a place that can connect a computer
    to check the codes IS the right thing to do.

    This group can't diagnose anything as vague as what you've posted, and
    if you want her to have reliable transportation (in case it's cold where
    you are) you should get the codes read soon.

    --
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Jan 12, 2009
    #4
  5. jan820

    Mike Marlow Guest

    On Sun, 11 Jan 2009 20:08:47 -0800 (PST), jan820 cast forth these pearls of
    wisdom...:

    > On Jan 11, 9:58 pm, Voyager <> wrote:
    >> jan820 wrote:
    >>> My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    >>> ago.  The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    >>> got it home.  She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    >>> light would go out.  Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    >>> accelerate and the check engine light is on.  Then it will sort of
    >>> surge and go into gear and drive normally.  the check engine light
    >>> still goes off when she restarts the car.  As far as I know, there is
    >>> no stalling or rough idling problem.
    >>> I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    >>> she seems to think so.
    >>> Any ideas?

    >>
    >> Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes.  This isn't rocket
    >> science.

    >
    > It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    > posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    > purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    > who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.


    Not really. A problem like yours requires some additional information
    before it can really be kicked around in a forum like this. So many things
    could cause a problem like your daughter is experiencing - so, having the
    codes in hand for any of today's cars is a must.

    Many of us here do a lot of work on Hyundais and other cars. Lots of
    expertise in this group. Not so hot on the crystal ball stuff though.

    I think though, that the real intent behind the question posed to you was
    that you daughter has some sort of warranty with that car. Why bother
    chasing things that are most likely covered by the warranty?

    --

    -Mike-
     
    Mike Marlow, Jan 12, 2009
    #5
  6. jan820

    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    "jan820" <> wrote in message
    >
    > Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes. This isn't rocket
    > science.


    It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.

    ************************************************

    Year ago, the shade tree mechanics could easily give you some ideas where to
    look. Cars are much more complex today, but the code readers simplify life
    in that respect. Takes away a lot of guesswork.

    If you are under warranty, go to the dealer. If not, many auto parts places
    will read the codes for you for free. Then, hopefully sell you some parts.
     
    Ed Pawlowski, Jan 12, 2009
    #6
  7. jan820

    Guest

    On Jan 11, 8:54 pm, jan820 <> wrote:
    > My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    > ago.  The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    > got it home.  She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    > light would go out.  Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    > accelerate and the check engine light is on.  Then it will sort of
    > surge and go into gear and drive normally.  the check engine light
    > still goes off when she restarts the car.  As far as I know, there is
    > no stalling or rough idling problem.
    > I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    > she seems to think so.
    > Any ideas?


    Sounds like a transmission-related problem. Most engine-related
    issues don't turn out the lamp on restarts. Transmission failsafe
    (3rd gear only) would explain poor acceleration.

    As others have suggested, have it checked by an appropriate party.
    The input and output speed sensors are the most common failures, but
    there are far too many possibilities to make a reliable guess without
    having at least a trouble code.
     
    , Jan 12, 2009
    #7
  8. jan820

    Voyager Guest

    jan820 wrote:
    > On Jan 11, 9:58 pm, Voyager <> wrote:
    >> jan820 wrote:
    >>> My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2 weeks
    >>> ago. The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as she
    >>> got it home. She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    >>> light would go out. Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    >>> accelerate and the check engine light is on. Then it will sort of
    >>> surge and go into gear and drive normally. the check engine light
    >>> still goes off when she restarts the car. As far as I know, there is
    >>> no stalling or rough idling problem.
    >>> I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem, but
    >>> she seems to think so.
    >>> Any ideas?

    >> Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes. This isn't rocket
    >> science.

    >
    > It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    > posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    > purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    > who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.


    There are probably at least half a dozen things that can cause what you
    describe. If you are expecting to get insight from the internet on what
    is wrong with a vehicle with what you describe above, then your
    expectations are well out of line with reality. The first step in
    diagnosing a vehicle with an illuminated CE light, is to find out what
    the computer thinks is wrong. It may not be completely correct, but
    that is the place to start and there is a LOT of insight in that
    recommendation (about 30 years worth).

    Matt
     
    Voyager, Jan 12, 2009
    #8
  9. jan820

    Voyager Guest

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > "jan820" <> wrote in message
    >> Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes. This isn't rocket
    >> science.

    >
    > It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    > posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    > purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    > who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.
    >
    > ************************************************
    >
    > Year ago, the shade tree mechanics could easily give you some ideas where to
    > look. Cars are much more complex today, but the code readers simplify life
    > in that respect. Takes away a lot of guesswork.
    >
    > If you are under warranty, go to the dealer. If not, many auto parts places
    > will read the codes for you for free. Then, hopefully sell you some parts.
    >
    >


    Beware of the AutoZone, et al code readers. I had AutoZone read a code
    on my Chevy truck and I was pretty sure it was incorrect for the
    symptoms. In fact, the code sounded like the LAST thing I had fixed on
    the truck. I then took it to a Chevy dealer and they read the correct
    code which wasn't even close to what AutoZone had said. The problem was
    the O2 sensor, but the code read was for the water temp sensor which I'd
    had replaced a few months earlier. I don't know what happened, but they
    definitely read the wrong code and there advice would have cost me money
    and not solved my problem.

    I'm amazed at the lengths that people will go to to avoid paying a few
    bucks for good advice. I learned long ago that good advice is what is
    really worth the money. I don't care if you are talking about financial
    matters, medical matters or modern cars. The diagnosis is where the
    money is saved or lost. NEVER scrimp on the diagnosis or the advice.
    It will cost you more almost every time.

    Matt
     
    Voyager, Jan 12, 2009
    #9
  10. jan820

    nothermark Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jan 2009 18:56:56 -0500, Voyager <>
    wrote:

    >Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >> "jan820" <> wrote in message
    >>> Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes. This isn't rocket
    >>> science.

    >>
    >> It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    >> posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    >> purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    >> who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.
    >>
    >> ************************************************
    >>
    >> Year ago, the shade tree mechanics could easily give you some ideas where to
    >> look. Cars are much more complex today, but the code readers simplify life
    >> in that respect. Takes away a lot of guesswork.
    >>
    >> If you are under warranty, go to the dealer. If not, many auto parts places
    >> will read the codes for you for free. Then, hopefully sell you some parts.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Beware of the AutoZone, et al code readers. I had AutoZone read a code
    >on my Chevy truck and I was pretty sure it was incorrect for the
    >symptoms. In fact, the code sounded like the LAST thing I had fixed on
    >the truck. I then took it to a Chevy dealer and they read the correct
    >code which wasn't even close to what AutoZone had said. The problem was
    >the O2 sensor, but the code read was for the water temp sensor which I'd
    >had replaced a few months earlier. I don't know what happened, but they
    >definitely read the wrong code and there advice would have cost me money
    >and not solved my problem.
    >
    >I'm amazed at the lengths that people will go to to avoid paying a few
    >bucks for good advice. I learned long ago that good advice is what is
    >really worth the money. I don't care if you are talking about financial
    >matters, medical matters or modern cars. The diagnosis is where the
    >money is saved or lost. NEVER scrimp on the diagnosis or the advice.
    >It will cost you more almost every time.
    >
    >Matt


    At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    you still have the problem.
     
    nothermark, Jan 13, 2009
    #10
  11. jan820

    Voyager Guest

    nothermark wrote:
    > On Mon, 12 Jan 2009 18:56:56 -0500, Voyager <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>> "jan820" <> wrote in message
    >>>> Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes. This isn't rocket
    >>>> science.
    >>> It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    >>> posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    >>> purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    >>> who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.
    >>>
    >>> ************************************************
    >>>
    >>> Year ago, the shade tree mechanics could easily give you some ideas where to
    >>> look. Cars are much more complex today, but the code readers simplify life
    >>> in that respect. Takes away a lot of guesswork.
    >>>
    >>> If you are under warranty, go to the dealer. If not, many auto parts places
    >>> will read the codes for you for free. Then, hopefully sell you some parts.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Beware of the AutoZone, et al code readers. I had AutoZone read a code
    >> on my Chevy truck and I was pretty sure it was incorrect for the
    >> symptoms. In fact, the code sounded like the LAST thing I had fixed on
    >> the truck. I then took it to a Chevy dealer and they read the correct
    >> code which wasn't even close to what AutoZone had said. The problem was
    >> the O2 sensor, but the code read was for the water temp sensor which I'd
    >> had replaced a few months earlier. I don't know what happened, but they
    >> definitely read the wrong code and there advice would have cost me money
    >> and not solved my problem.
    >>
    >> I'm amazed at the lengths that people will go to to avoid paying a few
    >> bucks for good advice. I learned long ago that good advice is what is
    >> really worth the money. I don't care if you are talking about financial
    >> matters, medical matters or modern cars. The diagnosis is where the
    >> money is saved or lost. NEVER scrimp on the diagnosis or the advice.
    >> It will cost you more almost every time.
    >>
    >> Matt

    >
    > At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    > the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    > use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    > is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    > you still have the problem.


    Yes, I certainly understand that. However, very few repairs cost less
    than $100, even for simple sensor issues. Since most times the light
    comes on indicates that something really is wrong (I'm not saying false
    alarms like a loose gas cap can't happen occasionally), you are going to
    spend probably at least $100 to fix it. If you get a faulty diagnosis
    for "free" and then spend $200 on a "repair" you didn't need and then
    have to spend another $200 to actually fix the problem, don't you think
    it would have been less expensive to spend $300 to correctly diagnose
    and fix the real problem as opposed to $400 to fix two problems, one of
    which you didn't really have?

    That was my only point. It would be nice to get a correct diagnosis for
    free, but I'd rather pay for a good one, than get a wrong one for free
    as the latter will almost always cost me more in the end.

    Matt
     
    Voyager, Jan 14, 2009
    #11
  12. jan820

    Guest

    If you have an Autozone near you,they will check the codes for free and
    tell you what they mean.
     
    , Jan 14, 2009
    #12
  13. jan820

    Mike Marlow Guest

    On 13 Jan 2009 06:30:01 -0600, nothermark cast forth these pearls of
    wisdom...:


    >
    > At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    > the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    > use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    > is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    > you still have the problem.


    What in the heck is the problem in learning how to use a code reader? It
    simply plugs in. Clearing the codes can be difficult - you have to press
    the right key... the one marked "clear".

    --

    -Mike-
     
    Mike Marlow, Jan 14, 2009
    #13
  14. wrote:
    > If you have an Autozone near you,they will check the codes for free and
    > tell you what they mean. When they checked me they found an empty cranium
    > and did my lobotomy right there at the store! Even let me make monthly
    > payments.


    Still riding the short bus I see.
     
    Biff Boilermaker, Jan 14, 2009
    #14
  15. jan820

    Voyager Guest

    Mike Marlow wrote:
    > On 13 Jan 2009 06:30:01 -0600, nothermark cast forth these pearls of
    > wisdom...:
    >
    >
    >> At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    >> the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    >> use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    >> is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    >> you still have the problem.

    >
    > What in the heck is the problem in learning how to use a code reader? It
    > simply plugs in. Clearing the codes can be difficult - you have to press
    > the right key... the one marked "clear".
    >


    Mike, please try to keep your discussions of advanced technology out of
    this ng. :)
     
    Voyager, Jan 14, 2009
    #15
  16. jan820

    Mike Marlow Guest

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 17:35:11 -0500, Voyager cast forth these pearls of
    wisdom...:

    > Mike Marlow wrote:
    >> On 13 Jan 2009 06:30:01 -0600, nothermark cast forth these pearls of
    >> wisdom...:
    >>
    >>
    >>> At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    >>> the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    >>> use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    >>> is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    >>> you still have the problem.

    >>
    >> What in the heck is the problem in learning how to use a code reader? It
    >> simply plugs in. Clearing the codes can be difficult - you have to press
    >> the right key... the one marked "clear".
    >>

    >
    > Mike, please try to keep your discussions of advanced technology out of
    > this ng. :)


    I'm sorry - sometimes I just get carried away...

    --

    -Mike-
     
    Mike Marlow, Jan 15, 2009
    #16
  17. jan820

    Irwell Guest

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 21:57:02 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:

    > On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 17:35:11 -0500, Voyager cast forth these pearls of
    > wisdom...:
    >
    >> Mike Marlow wrote:
    >>> On 13 Jan 2009 06:30:01 -0600, nothermark cast forth these pearls of
    >>> wisdom...:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    >>>> the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    >>>> use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    >>>> is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    >>>> you still have the problem.
    >>>
    >>> What in the heck is the problem in learning how to use a code reader? It
    >>> simply plugs in. Clearing the codes can be difficult - you have to press
    >>> the right key... the one marked "clear".
    >>>

    >>
    >> Mike, please try to keep your discussions of advanced technology out of
    >> this ng. :)

    >
    > I'm sorry - sometimes I just get carried away...


    But not far enough, next time don't bother returning.
     
    Irwell, Jan 15, 2009
    #17
  18. jan820

    Mike Marlow Guest

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 19:14:59 -0800, Irwell cast forth these pearls of
    wisdom...:

    > On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 21:57:02 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 17:35:11 -0500, Voyager cast forth these pearls of
    >> wisdom...:
    >>
    >>> Mike Marlow wrote:
    >>>> On 13 Jan 2009 06:30:01 -0600, nothermark cast forth these pearls of
    >>>> wisdom...:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    >>>>> the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    >>>>> use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    >>>>> is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    >>>>> you still have the problem.
    >>>>
    >>>> What in the heck is the problem in learning how to use a code reader? It
    >>>> simply plugs in. Clearing the codes can be difficult - you have to press
    >>>> the right key... the one marked "clear".
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Mike, please try to keep your discussions of advanced technology out of
    >>> this ng. :)

    >>
    >> I'm sorry - sometimes I just get carried away...

    >
    > But not far enough, next time don't bother returning.


    I phart in your general direction sir...

    --

    -Mike-
     
    Mike Marlow, Jan 15, 2009
    #18
  19. jan820

    Voyager Guest

    Mike Marlow wrote:
    > On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 19:14:59 -0800, Irwell cast forth these pearls of
    > wisdom...:
    >
    >> On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 21:57:02 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 17:35:11 -0500, Voyager cast forth these pearls of
    >>> wisdom...:
    >>>
    >>>> Mike Marlow wrote:
    >>>>> On 13 Jan 2009 06:30:01 -0600, nothermark cast forth these pearls of
    >>>>> wisdom...:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> At $100/shop hr and an hour minimum billing to run the code reader at
    >>>>>> the dealer I am not surprised. The real problem is learning how to
    >>>>>> use a reader including clearing old codes when you fix something. That
    >>>>>> is assuming you did fix it. If you cleared the code and it came back
    >>>>>> you still have the problem.
    >>>>> What in the heck is the problem in learning how to use a code reader? It
    >>>>> simply plugs in. Clearing the codes can be difficult - you have to press
    >>>>> the right key... the one marked "clear".
    >>>>>
    >>>> Mike, please try to keep your discussions of advanced technology out of
    >>>> this ng. :)
    >>> I'm sorry - sometimes I just get carried away...

    >> But not far enough, next time don't bother returning.

    >
    > I phart in your general direction sir...
    >


    Why waste a good fart?
     
    Voyager, Jan 16, 2009
    #19
  20. jan820

    TheChris Guest

    jan820 <> wrote in news:11546c33-5d7a-4ab0-8a54-
    :

    > On Jan 11, 9:58 pm, Voyager <> wrote:
    >> jan820 wrote:
    >> > My daughter just bought a 2001 Elantra, automatic transmission 2

    weeks
    >> > ago.  The check engine light started coming on almost as soon as

    she
    >> > got it home.  She would turn off the ignition, re-start it and the
    >> > light would go out.  Now, she says it hesitates and will not
    >> > accelerate and the check engine light is on.  Then it will sort of
    >> > surge and go into gear and drive normally.  the check engine light
    >> > still goes off when she restarts the car.  As far as I know, there

    is
    >> > no stalling or rough idling problem.
    >> > I am not certain if the CE light is related to the other problem,

    but
    >> > she seems to think so.
    >> > Any ideas?

    >>
    >> Take it to a Hyundai and have them check the codes.  This isn't

    rocket
    >> science.

    >
    > It's ok, I am not mechanically inclined either. That is why I
    > posted. However running off to the Hyundai dealer sort of defeats the
    > purpose of this forum. I was hoping to get some insight from someone
    > who knows about Hyundais. Thanks for your insightful response though.
    >


    The codes are really important - In my area, ANY AutoZone or Auto place
    will plug in under your steering wheel and tell you the code.

    It can be any number of many things - so, there's no way to guess at
    those things....
     
    TheChris, Jan 21, 2009
    #20
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