2002 Accent rotor removal

Discussion in 'Hyundai Accent' started by nobody, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. nobody

    nobody Guest

    I need to replace pads and rotors on my 2002 Accent, can anyone tell me
    if these rotors are pressed on, or can I replace them without needing
    the assistance of a shop. Thanks,
     
    nobody, Apr 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. nobody wrote:
    > I need to replace pads and rotors on my 2002 Accent, can anyone tell me
    > if these rotors are pressed on, or can I replace them without needing
    > the assistance of a shop. Thanks,


    I just replaced the rotors on my Elantra this weekend, which is similar
    to your Accent. The rotors are not pressed on, but they tend to rust in
    place. Generally, the only way to get them off is to cut them down to
    the hub in two places and split them, which is not as difficult as it
    sounds. I made hacksaw cuts that lined up with the holes for the rotor
    retaining screws and split them by driving a screwdriver into the saw
    cuts. It took ~10 minutes per cut with a hacksaw and a sharp 18 TPI
    blade. Even after splitting them, it still took some "persuasion" with a
    mallet to get them off, due to rust around the periphery of the hub. I
    cleaned that up with a file once the old rotors were off and the new
    ones slid right into place.

    BTW, the heads of the rotor retaining screws will almost invariably
    shear off when you try to remove them. It doesn't matter as they're not
    structural, simply an assembly convenience. The wheels hold the rotors
    tight to the hubs and the studs and hubs position them properly, so the
    screws aren't necessary.
     
    Brian Nystrom, Apr 30, 2007
    #2
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  3. nobody

    nobody Guest

    Wow, so you are actually sawing through the rotor and more or less
    breaking it off the hub? I suppose this would be less traumatic than
    pounding away with a hammer to break them free.


    Brian Nystrom wrote:
    > I just replaced the rotors on my Elantra this weekend, which is similar
    > to your Accent. The rotors are not pressed on, but they tend to rust in
    > place. Generally, the only way to get them off is to cut them down to
    > the hub in two places and split them, which is not as difficult as it
    > sounds. I made hacksaw cuts that lined up with the holes for the rotor
    > retaining screws and split them by driving a screwdriver into the saw
    > cuts. It took ~10 minutes per cut with a hacksaw and a sharp 18 TPI
    > blade. Even after splitting them, it still took some "persuasion" with a
    > mallet to get them off, due to rust around the periphery of the hub. I
    > cleaned that up with a file once the old rotors were off and the new
    > ones slid right into place.
    >
    > BTW, the heads of the rotor retaining screws will almost invariably
    > shear off when you try to remove them. It doesn't matter as they're not
    > structural, simply an assembly convenience. The wheels hold the rotors
    > tight to the hubs and the studs and hubs position them properly, so the
    > screws aren't necessary.
     
    nobody, Apr 30, 2007
    #3
  4. nobody

    Finn Guest

    This is what i did.
    Heat them up with a torch and a few light taps with a mallet and they were
    off.

    Just my 0.02 $
    Finn



    "nobody" <> wrote in message
    news:BqlZh.141093$...
    > Wow, so you are actually sawing through the rotor and more or less
    > breaking it off the hub? I suppose this would be less traumatic than
    > pounding away with a hammer to break them free.
    >
    >
    > Brian Nystrom wrote:
    >> I just replaced the rotors on my Elantra this weekend, which is similar
    >> to your Accent. The rotors are not pressed on, but they tend to rust in
    >> place. Generally, the only way to get them off is to cut them down to the
    >> hub in two places and split them, which is not as difficult as it sounds.
    >> I made hacksaw cuts that lined up with the holes for the rotor retaining
    >> screws and split them by driving a screwdriver into the saw cuts. It took
    >> ~10 minutes per cut with a hacksaw and a sharp 18 TPI blade. Even after
    >> splitting them, it still took some "persuasion" with a mallet to get them
    >> off, due to rust around the periphery of the hub. I cleaned that up with
    >> a file once the old rotors were off and the new ones slid right into
    >> place.
    >>
    >> BTW, the heads of the rotor retaining screws will almost invariably shear
    >> off when you try to remove them. It doesn't matter as they're not
    >> structural, simply an assembly convenience. The wheels hold the rotors
    >> tight to the hubs and the studs and hubs position them properly, so the
    >> screws aren't necessary.
     
    Finn, Apr 30, 2007
    #4
  5. nobody

    nobody Guest

    Sounds good. As long as they are not pressed on, I'm fairly confident I
    can coax them off the hubs. I was just curious if they were pressed on
    before I bought the pads and rotors and swapped them out myself. Thanks,

    Finn wrote:
    > This is what i did.
    > Heat them up with a torch and a few light taps with a mallet and they were
    > off.
    >
    > Just my 0.02 $
    > Finn
    >
    >
    >
    > "nobody" <> wrote in message
    > news:BqlZh.141093$...
    >> Wow, so you are actually sawing through the rotor and more or less
    >> breaking it off the hub? I suppose this would be less traumatic than
    >> pounding away with a hammer to break them free.
    >>
    >>
    >> Brian Nystrom wrote:
    >>> I just replaced the rotors on my Elantra this weekend, which is similar
    >>> to your Accent. The rotors are not pressed on, but they tend to rust in
    >>> place. Generally, the only way to get them off is to cut them down to the
    >>> hub in two places and split them, which is not as difficult as it sounds.
    >>> I made hacksaw cuts that lined up with the holes for the rotor retaining
    >>> screws and split them by driving a screwdriver into the saw cuts. It took
    >>> ~10 minutes per cut with a hacksaw and a sharp 18 TPI blade. Even after
    >>> splitting them, it still took some "persuasion" with a mallet to get them
    >>> off, due to rust around the periphery of the hub. I cleaned that up with
    >>> a file once the old rotors were off and the new ones slid right into
    >>> place.
    >>>
    >>> BTW, the heads of the rotor retaining screws will almost invariably shear
    >>> off when you try to remove them. It doesn't matter as they're not
    >>> structural, simply an assembly convenience. The wheels hold the rotors
    >>> tight to the hubs and the studs and hubs position them properly, so the
    >>> screws aren't necessary.

    >
    >
     
    nobody, Apr 30, 2007
    #5
  6. nobody wrote:
    > Wow, so you are actually sawing through the rotor and more or less
    > breaking it off the hub?


    Exactly. It sounds rather draconian, but it's a lot gentler than wailing
    on them with a sledge hammer.

    > I suppose this would be less traumatic than
    > pounding away with a hammer to break them free.


    There's no way I would ever have gotten them off without cutting them,
    as they're were rusted to the hub at it's periphery. I did try using a
    3# hand sledge carefully to free them, but they wouldn't budge. Rather
    than wailing on them and risking trashing the bearings, I cut them off.
    I had seen this same thing recommended by several people on the Elantra
    Club website and it works well.

    Perhaps if you have access to an oxy-acetylene torch (I don't), you
    might be able to heat them enough to break them free, but I think you'd
    be hard-pressed to heat something as large as a rotor enough with a
    propane torch. Keep in mind that heating can also cook the grease in the
    hub and/or damage the bearings. The key is to heat the rotor very
    quickly, causing it to expand away from the hub, then remove it before
    the hub gets too hot. That requires a lot of heat.
     
    Brian Nystrom, Apr 30, 2007
    #6
  7. nobody

    nobody Guest

    The hacksaw is total committment to the job, that is for sure. :)

    I once had to bash a set of rotors off of a Ford F150, and I can only
    remember it not being loads of fun. Lots of time, penetrating sprays,
    time and hammering were involved. Needless to say that if there were
    any chance of turning those rotors before, there was no chance after I
    was done with them...

    On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 16:41:50 GMT, Brian Nystrom
    <> wrote:

    >nobody wrote:
    >> Wow, so you are actually sawing through the rotor and more or less
    >> breaking it off the hub?

    >
    >Exactly. It sounds rather draconian, but it's a lot gentler than wailing
    >on them with a sledge hammer.
    >
    >> I suppose this would be less traumatic than
    >> pounding away with a hammer to break them free.

    >
    >There's no way I would ever have gotten them off without cutting them,
    >as they're were rusted to the hub at it's periphery. I did try using a
    >3# hand sledge carefully to free them, but they wouldn't budge. Rather
    >than wailing on them and risking trashing the bearings, I cut them off.
    >I had seen this same thing recommended by several people on the Elantra
    >Club website and it works well.
    >
    >Perhaps if you have access to an oxy-acetylene torch (I don't), you
    >might be able to heat them enough to break them free, but I think you'd
    >be hard-pressed to heat something as large as a rotor enough with a
    >propane torch. Keep in mind that heating can also cook the grease in the
    >hub and/or damage the bearings. The key is to heat the rotor very
    >quickly, causing it to expand away from the hub, then remove it before
    >the hub gets too hot. That requires a lot of heat.
     
    nobody, Apr 30, 2007
    #7
  8. nobody wrote:
    > The hacksaw is total committment to the job, that is for sure. :)
    >
    > I once had to bash a set of rotors off of a Ford F150, and I can only
    > remember it not being loads of fun. Lots of time, penetrating sprays,
    > time and hammering were involved. Needless to say that if there were
    > any chance of turning those rotors before, there was no chance after I
    > was done with them...


    Exactly. Whether you cut them or beat them, they're trashed either way.
    The question then becomes how much damage do you do to yourself and the
    rest of the car. Cutting them off minimizes both.
     
    Brian Nystrom, May 1, 2007
    #8
  9. nobody

    nobody Guest

    I'm going to pick up pads and rotors for the weekend. Looks like a
    couple of hacksaw blades as well.

    So how many cuts are you making in order to get the rotor off? I'm
    guessnig you are sawing through to near the hub in at least two
    places?

    On Tue, 01 May 2007 11:19:48 GMT, Brian Nystrom
    <> wrote:

    >nobody wrote:
    >> The hacksaw is total committment to the job, that is for sure. :)
    >>
    >> I once had to bash a set of rotors off of a Ford F150, and I can only
    >> remember it not being loads of fun. Lots of time, penetrating sprays,
    >> time and hammering were involved. Needless to say that if there were
    >> any chance of turning those rotors before, there was no chance after I
    >> was done with them...

    >
    >Exactly. Whether you cut them or beat them, they're trashed either way.
    >The question then becomes how much damage do you do to yourself and the
    >rest of the car. Cutting them off minimizes both.
     
    nobody, May 1, 2007
    #9
  10. nobody

    billyboy24d Guest

    On Apr 30, 6:57 am, Brian Nystrom <> wrote:
    > nobody wrote:
    > > I need to replace pads and rotors on my 2002 Accent, can anyone tell me
    > > if these rotors are pressed on, or can I replace them without needing
    > > the assistance of a shop. Thanks,

    >
    > I just replaced the rotors on my Elantra this weekend, which is similar
    > to your Accent. The rotors are not pressed on, but they tend to rust in
    > place. Generally, the only way to get them off is to cut them down to
    > the hub in two places and split them, which is not as difficult as it
    > sounds. I made hacksaw cuts that lined up with the holes for the rotor
    > retaining screws and split them by driving a screwdriver into the saw
    > cuts. It took ~10 minutes per cut with a hacksaw and a sharp 18 TPI
    > blade. Even after splitting them, it still took some "persuasion" with a
    > mallet to get them off, due to rust around the periphery of the hub. I
    > cleaned that up with a file once the old rotors were off and the new
    > ones slid right into place.
    >
    > BTW, the heads of the rotor retaining screws will almost invariably
    > shear off when you try to remove them. It doesn't matter as they're not
    > structural, simply an assembly convenience. The wheels hold the rotors
    > tight to the hubs and the studs and hubs position them properly, so the
    > screws aren't necessary.


    If you have a compressor ( or know somone who does), an air chissel
    works great. Most of them come with differrent bits and are cheep.
    Putting it on the back of the rotor, it will push it off with minimum
    dammage to anything including the rotor (depends on how carful you
    are) and no chance of a hammer slipping out of your hand and hitting a
    fender or smashing something (hand). A lot of shops use this method.
    Bill
     
    billyboy24d, May 2, 2007
    #10
  11. nobody wrote:
    > I'm going to pick up pads and rotors for the weekend. Looks like a
    > couple of hacksaw blades as well.
    >
    > So how many cuts are you making in order to get the rotor off? I'm
    > guessnig you are sawing through to near the hub in at least two
    > places?


    Correct, two cuts on opposite sides of the rotor. I made the cuts in
    line with the retaining screw holes, but that leaves two studs in each
    half. In retrospect, I wonder if it might have been smarter to make the
    cuts in line with the studs, which would leave only one stud in each half.
     
    Brian Nystrom, May 3, 2007
    #11
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