Play the odds with a timing belt?

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by Dan K, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. Dan K

    Dan K Guest

    Anybody (hyundaitech ?) know how the 60,000 mile change interval came about
    for a timing belt (2002 XG350)? It has to be an odds thing, right?
    Something like 99.4% will not fail before 60,000 miles (and if they do
    Hyundai has to pay to repair the engine - so you know that number is pretty
    close to 100%). Does the failure rate really increase that dramatically
    after 60k miles? what about 70k? 80k? I guess I'm wondering how much
    extra risk I would be taking if I were to push this interval up to where I
    would only have to replace the belt once instead of twice during the life of
    the car (I'm expecting 150k - 200k miles out of this vehicle). Anyone care
    to hazzard a guess? At about $1000 a belt change its a valid question. I'm
    the second owner of the vehicle, so there is no warrenty after 60,000 miles.

    Dan
     
    Dan K, Jun 17, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Dan K

    hyundaitech Guest

    I've not yet seen one of these belts fail, but I don't want to either. The
    thing that scares me is that the belt wrap around the cam sprocket is
    similar to the engines which have timing belt issues.

    My recommendation is to not play the odds. I had to install a new engine
    in an XG because the owner didn't change the oil frequently enough. The
    parts alone were $6500. At those prices, the savings don't compare to the
    losses of paying for engine repair. If your timing belt strips or breaks,
    you're probably looking at least at pulling both heads and replacing the
    valves. I don't have any engineering numbers to spout, so I suppose you
    need to ask yourself how high stakes a gambler you are.
     
    hyundaitech, Jun 17, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Dan K

    Rick Guest

    Hey Hyundaitech, this is an interesting subject. I've seen you and others
    talk about certain Hyundai engines that are more prone to eat timing belts
    than others. I'm getting close to having mine done for the third time, but
    I'm curious as to what engines are belt eaters. I once had a 2.0 liter
    Mitsubishi that promptly ate a belt at the 60000 mile interval. Wasn't the
    earlier Hyundai engines a Mitsubishi design?

    Rick
    SGF, MO
     
    Rick, Jun 18, 2005
    #3
  4. I would imagine the newer Hyundai's will have a longer period of
    replacement (more durable belt) as the price of their vehicles is
    climbing???

    The 60k mile interval is one reason I wont buy a Hyundai ....yet....
    I plan on getting 100k out of my Camry belt b4 I change it. Maybe 110k.
     
    Charles Pisano, Jun 18, 2005
    #4
  5. Dan K

    Jody Guest

    06 sonata utilizes a steel chain, i hope its true for rest of the new line up
    I would imagine the newer Hyundai's will have a longer period of
    replacement (more durable belt) as the price of their vehicles is
    climbing???

    The 60k mile interval is one reason I wont buy a Hyundai ....yet....
    I plan on getting 100k out of my Camry belt b4 I change it. Maybe 110k.
     
    Jody, Jun 18, 2005
    #5
  6. Dan K

    hyundaitech Guest

    If it's the engine I'm thinking of, it's the same 2.0 (just built by
    Hyundai rather than Mitsu) used in the Sonata from 1992 to 1998.

    Here's my list of engines which eat timing belts based on experience
    (Applies to U.S. only. Different head and cam designs are possible in
    other countries):
    1992-1995 Elantra -- 1.6L, 1.8L
    1992-1998 Sonata -- 2.0L
    1999-2005 Sonata -- 2.4L
    2001-2004 Santa Fe -- 2.4L
     
    hyundaitech, Jun 18, 2005
    #6
  7. Dan K

    Rick Guest

    Thanks Hyundaitech appreciate the info from your first hand experiences.
    Can't beat information like that!!!!

    Rick
    SGF, MO
     
    Rick, Jun 18, 2005
    #7
  8. Dan K

    nothermark Guest

    All the cars I've had that use a belt have been 60K back to my mid
    60's golf. If the factory thinks 60K i wouldn't push it all that
    hard. the real factor is probably years/heat/total engine rev's.
    Those things stay pretty consistent to the point where I would not
    believe i manufacturer that pushed the number way out. The bottom
    line is that a belt is a lot cheaper than an engine.
    YMMV
     
    nothermark, Jun 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Re: Play the odds with a timing belt? 2006 Intervals??

    Group: alt.autos.hyundai Date: Sun, Jun 19, 2005, 12:46pm (EDT+4) From:
    (nothermark)

    -All the cars I've had that use a belt have been 60K back to my mid 60's
    golf. If the factory thinks 60K i wouldn't push it all that hard. the
    real factor is probably years/heat/total engine rev's. Those things stay
    pretty consistent to the point where I would not believe i manufacturer
    that pushed the number way out. The bottom line is that a belt is a lot
    cheaper than an engine. YMMV -



    My '01 Camry's owners manual says the timing belt needs to be changed
    at 90k miles.
    I should change mine sooner because your Golf had to be changed
    sooner???

    I'm at 80k miles.
     
    Charles Pisano, Jun 24, 2005
    #9
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.