XG350 Do you own one? A they a good car?

Discussion in 'Hyundai Grandeur / Azera / XG' started by rcpeters, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. rcpeters

    rcpeters Guest

    Before buying a 1998 Cadillac Catera, I considered the Hyundai XG350,
    because it was about the same size and had nearly identical features plus
    a slightly larger engine. The Catera has a 3.0 6 cylinder engine. The
    Catera was less expensive because of the unfavorable maintenance history
    of that model. My warranty is good for 3 more years, and then I may look
    at the Hyundai again, especially now that a new service center is being
    established near me.

    I couldn't find anything about owner's experiences with the Hyundai and as
    the dealer was not near me, I decided to pass on the Hyundai.

    So please tell me your experience with the XG350? How much did you pay
    for it, how many miles and have you had any unusual repair experiences?
    How are they as a daily driver and for long trips?
     
    rcpeters, Feb 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. rcpeters

    Dan K Guest

    We bought a used 2002 a year ago for my wife and I liked it so much I
    bought another used 2002 for myself (figure parts swap later on in life).
    One
    had some extensive time in the shop (all 100% under warrenty) to fix
    intermittant problems - probably why it got traded in - turned out to be
    an intermittant short in the wiring plus a couple other things, but other
    than
    that they have been great. The only thing I don't like about them is their
    parts seem to be quite expensive. Tranny fluid almost $5 a quart, Fram air
    filter $20 when every other Fram is around $8. Don't even think
    of replacing the inner cabin air filter...$40. You also have to take the
    engine apart
    to change sparkplugs (which I havn't done yet, but my 60,000 is comming up
    and I'll have to do plugs and timing belt then). On a positive, its
    probably the
    easiest car I've ever worked on to do oil, tranny fluid, and antifreeze
    changes.
     
    Dan K, Feb 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. We bought the XG350L new in Oct 2003, and now have 8000 mile w/o any
    problems. We get about 15 MPG in town and almost double that on the
    highway.

    Love the car!

    See www.epinion.com for more info.
     
    Cathy De Viney, Feb 6, 2005
    #3
  4. rcpeters

    nobody Guest

    Bought a new 2002 XG350. It has 22,000 miles on it already. NO problems
    whatsoever mechanically. The ride and comfort levels are excellent. I just
    found out in a thread of this NG why the drivers side window seemed to roll
    down on it's own occasionally. It was operator error. A senior moment on
    my part. lol it seems that is a feature on the car to enhance getting heat
    out of the car when it has been out in the sun on a hot day.

    The radio is about a worthless piece of poo but has an excellent
    cd/cassette player sound system in it. The teen aged kid next door to me
    came over one day and wanted to know what kind of Bass subwoofer amp I had.
    I told her none and she couldn't believe it.

    Stations received on the FM radio are about half as good reception as my
    wife's Buick Regal radio. The AM side is a joke. A 5,000 watt AM station
    cannot be heard over the engine whine over 7-8 miles from the station. It
    is junk. It is not much better with the engine not running. If the station
    is not close, you won't hear it. A $5.00 transister radio would be a far
    better receiver hung on the rearview mirror like we used to do 45 years ago
    when you didn't want to run your car battery down with vacuum tube
    monstrousities

    It is geared a little low for me and will about snap your neck at low speed
    when you get on it taking off. I think a little higher gear ratio would not
    only help that problem, but help on city fuel economy too. i believe it
    would still have plenty of power with the change. At 60 mph in 5th gear it
    turns about 500 rpm faster than my wife's Buick at the same speed and in
    5th gear also.. Her 3.8 litre GM v/6 will beat the fuel economy in town but
    the XG350 will outrun it hands down. You can drag race with it if you want
    to.
     
    nobody, Feb 13, 2005
    #4
  5. rcpeters

    hackblack Guest

    We bought an '03 XG350L in Dec 2003 and have no complaints. I'd buy another
    one. Car has great power. I still haven't gotten used to the initial surge
    when accelerating. On a recent trip it got 27+mpg on the highway. In the
    city, it's been around 22-23. Only negative so far, like the previous
    poster mentioned, the wiring for the radio is total crap. CD/Cassette
    player work fine. For the FM dial, the reception and sound is great. But,
    for the AM, it worthless. AM comes in with a lot of static in this car.
    Also, if you run the rear-defrost, the radio reception is effected. Per
    our Hyundai Service Manager, this is due to the antennae being in the rear
    window. Bad design on Hyundai's part. Friends/Family can't believe how
    loaded the vehicle is. We chose the XG350L over a Volvo S80.
     
    hackblack, Feb 22, 2005
    #5
  6. rcpeters

    Jacob Suter Guest

    Which is why AM is friggin worthless.

    You realize a standard radio ariel is worth about 1mpg. Considering
    theres nothing worth listening to on FM much less AM, this is no major
    loss...

    JS
     
    Jacob Suter, Feb 22, 2005
    #6
  7. rcpeters

    who Guest

    Well, unfortunately, if you want news, weather, and sports or even the
    cursed talk radio, you have only two other alternatives. One is to
    subscribe to a satellite radio service, the other and cheaper fix is to use
    the wiring and speakers in the car and add an after market receiver to the
    car. I have written to Hyundai about this and they claim that they are
    making improvements to newer models. I have a friend that installed an
    after market top of the line Kenwood and a electrical telescoping antenna
    on the front fender. He now has a good system. He used the existing speaker
    system and wiring harness.

    I really cannot figure out why the engineers would ever put some junk into
    this otherwise luxurious vehicle.
     
    who, Mar 3, 2005
    #7
  8. | Well, unfortunately, if you want news, weather, and sports or
    even the
    | cursed talk radio, you have only two other alternatives. One is
    to
    | subscribe to a satellite radio service, the other and cheaper
    fix is to use
    | the wiring and speakers in the car and add an after market
    receiver to the
    | car. I have written to Hyundai about this and they claim that
    they are
    | making improvements to newer models. I have a friend that
    installed an
    | after market top of the line Kenwood and a electrical
    telescoping antenna
    | on the front fender. He now has a good system. He used the
    existing speaker
    | system and wiring harness.
    |
    | I really cannot figure out why the engineers would ever put
    some junk into
    | this otherwise luxurious vehicle.
    |

    I am knowledgeable about sound equipment. However, I'm new to
    Hyundai installations. The performance on the stock radio in my
    (new to me) 2000 Sonata seems quite respectable; I've only had
    the car for three days, so I haven't gotten around to testing the
    CD and cassette sections (the first step will be to clean and
    demagnetize the cassette head).

    From what I've read in this thread, it's obvious that the OP's
    problem has nothing to do with the equipment, but is isolated to
    the antenna in the rear window -- a design that'll deliver
    terrible reception. I'd assume that Hyundai would have put a
    receiver of very good quality into the XG350.

    A standard ordinary antenna should fix the problem. Antennas are
    just plain physics; very simple devices. Cheap ones perform as
    well as expensive ones. They just have to be long enough to
    resonate within the FM band (I recall 31 or 32 inches). The AM
    usually will take care of itself given at least this much length.
    Always remember that with an electric antenna, you need enough
    unobstructed depth underneath the thing to accomodate its
    retracted length. That's why an ordinary "8-ball" whip design may
    offer more placement options. It may not be practical for this
    individual car, but my favorite location for an antenna is high
    up at the right rear just next to the roof, pointing staight up.

    It would be logical that Hyundai's radio uses an ordinary
    standard antenna connection at the radio, despite their use of a
    custom inferior window antanna. To a "real" aftermarket antenna,
    you can simply remove the existing cable and use either the one
    that comes with the conventional antenna, or install it with an
    extension cable. Note that when installing a whip antenna, the
    antenna must be firmly grounded to the metal of the car body.

    Always be alert to the incredible amount of BS surrounding car
    stereo. The reason why I just bought the Hyundai is that my last
    car was totaled by a drunk who smashed into it. In the meantime,
    I've been catching up on the "state of the OEM art" in a couple
    of rental cars. What impressed me is the utter lack of respect
    for the user's CDs. The design of the CD slots ensures that CDs
    will get dirty and scratched from simply inserting and removing
    them. Auto cassette designs are a -little- better, but they've
    always been designed so that if the tape gets stuck in the
    mechanism, the only way to get it out is to remove the radio from
    the dashboard and open up the radio. Ouch!!!

    Richard
     
    Richard Steinfeld, Mar 3, 2005
    #8
  9. rcpeters

    Jacob Suter Guest

    If its a Hyundai stereo, I can tell you its the lame reciever. When you
    live in a country thats dwarfed by most states high performance FM
    reception isn't much of an issue...

    The window-based antenna has some funky issues. It obviously has less
    gain than a standard fender dipole, due to the fact its more
    'influenced' by the body metal, but its backed up by a very powerful
    signal booster... Unluckily this boosts *everything* including totally
    out-of-band noise which lowers the overall peformance of the FM
    reciever...

    From what I can tell the amplifier will get you VERY good signal *if*
    the antenna is getting much of a signal. Soon as the signal drops out
    (or a heavy noise generator is nearby, like another FM station) the
    reciever's effective performance goes straight into the hole. This
    isn't a big deal rural but it makes for lousy radio performance in the
    city...
     
    Jacob Suter, Mar 4, 2005
    #9
  10. | If its a Hyundai stereo, I can tell you its the lame reciever.
    When you
    | live in a country thats dwarfed by most states high performance
    FM
    | reception isn't much of an issue...
    |
    | The window-based antenna has some funky issues. It obviously
    has less
    | gain than a standard fender dipole, due to the fact its more
    | 'influenced' by the body metal, but its backed up by a very
    powerful
    | signal booster... Unluckily this boosts *everything* including
    totally
    | out-of-band noise which lowers the overall peformance of the FM
    | reciever...
    |
    | From what I can tell the amplifier will get you VERY good
    signal *if*
    | the antenna is getting much of a signal. Soon as the signal
    drops out
    | (or a heavy noise generator is nearby, like another FM station)
    the
    | reciever's effective performance goes straight into the hole.
    This
    | isn't a big deal rural but it makes for lousy radio performance
    in the
    | city...
    |

    Agreed.
    But let me introduce another consideration: Hyundai typically
    would offer a few different stereo receivers for every car model
    (they did for my car). It's reasonable to assume that some are
    good, and some are "entry-level" quality. The cheapos are pretty
    poor.

    I live in an urban region that can get rather nasty regarding FM
    reception. I've also kept tabs on signal propagation patterns as
    part of a former business. Here in the San Francisco Bay Area, as
    you can imagine, there is a mixture of flat lowlands and steep
    hills that run pretty high above sea level -- reception can be
    messy. So far, I'd say that the radio in my 2000 Sonata GLS is
    pretty decent.

    Obviously, if reception of any radio is going to have a chance,
    the window antenna's gotta go. A conventional monopole whip is
    what's needed. And they're dirt cheap.

    Another consideration: AM radio has always been transmitted with
    vertical polarization. This means that the carrier waves are
    broadcast in vertical "ripples." A horizontal antenna is oriented
    exactly wrong for decent efficiency, and that's what's in that
    window. FM is transmitted in the horizontal plane. However, it's
    also transmitted in the vertical plane, too, and the percentage
    of vertical to horizontal power has grown steadily: "drive-time"
    advertising is sold at a premium, and the best way to get the
    most people listening to your advertisers during drive time is
    with drive-radios, and this requires vertical whip antennas. I
    rest my case.

    Richard
     
    Richard Steinfeld, Mar 4, 2005
    #10
  11. rcpeters

    who Guest

    I am a ham radio operator and the condition you are referring to is
    "intermod|"

    I went to the local Hyundai dealer here in Mo. to talk to him about the
    problem. His response was "Well no one listens to AM anyway and you can get
    the local FM stations, can't you?" "That is all you need anyway"
    I laughed at his apparent lack of knowlege about any type of radio
    reception, and walked out.

    As an advocate of outside antennas for better reception from radios to
    2-way radios to cell phones, I believe that one area would probably fix a
    majority of the difficulty. Just stepping out of a vehicle with a hanie
    talkie can give a vhf signal as much as a 9db gain in signal strength.
     
    who, Mar 5, 2005
    #11
  12. rcpeters

    who Guest

    You are correct Richard. If anyone doubts this try taking a vhf or even a
    uhf low power handie talkie that uses vertical polarization in it's
    transmit and receive of a distant repeater. you lay the talkie over on it's
    side and you will lose the repeater due to it's polarization change in
    respect to the vertical antenna at the transmitter site. AM reception has
    long been vertically polarized signals since it's inception years ago.
    There is some bending over the long distance propagation called skip, but
    most of the local stuff relies on ground wave vertically polarization. on
    1.8 to 2.0 MHZ known as the 160 meter amateur band, a lot of hams use
    cross polarization for fairly local communications 25-50 miles. A
    vertically polarized antenna will outperform the latter on long distance
    propagation.
    you seem quite knowledgeable in your statements. I wonder if you are in
    some way associated with the broadcast industry or are perhaps an amateur.
     
    who, Mar 5, 2005
    #12
  13. | You are correct Richard. If anyone doubts this try taking a vhf
    or even a
    | uhf low power handie talkie that uses vertical polarization in
    it's
    | transmit and receive of a distant repeater. you lay the talkie
    over on it's
    | side and you will lose the repeater due to it's polarization
    change in
    | respect to the vertical antenna at the transmitter site. AM
    reception has
    | long been vertically polarized signals since it's inception
    years ago.
    | There is some bending over the long distance propagation called
    skip, but
    | most of the local stuff relies on ground wave vertically
    polarization. on
    | 1.8 to 2.0 MHZ known as the 160 meter amateur band, a lot of
    hams use
    | cross polarization for fairly local communications 25-50 miles.
    A
    | vertically polarized antenna will outperform the latter on long
    distance
    | propagation.
    | you seem quite knowledgeable in your statements. I wonder if
    you are in
    | some way associated with the broadcast industry or are perhaps
    an amateur.
    |

    Thanks for asking.

    My experience has been concentrated in music, audio, music
    psychology, and music technology. Along the way, I've been a
    classical radio announcer (operating a commercial broadcasting
    station while one duty), and put in time as a technical writer in
    the trenches of Silicon Valley, handling a few broadcast radio
    and cell phone re-transmission projects. In writing, I try to
    explain technology in "English," so that the information is
    understandable by everyday folks. I hope that I've done this in
    my former post.

    I also had my own custom stereo business a while back. So, in
    these lines of work, I've always taken note of signal propagation
    characteristics wherever I've lived and worked. I also know how
    entertainment radio audio is juggled and mushed by the
    broadcasters. All this comes home to roost when I drive around
    listening to this Hyundai radio: I note, too, that the particular
    radio is the top model offered for the 2000 Sonata -- it's the
    one with the CD changer, all ready to jam up (I don't trust these
    mechanisms). I'm certainly not an expert about Hyundai radios --
    I haven't had the car a week!

    No, I haven't been a ham. However, let me acknowledge that you
    folks know your stuff about antennas and propagation -- amateur
    radio people are awesome in this. I suspect that hams know more
    about antennas than the people who design them for a living.
    The concepts involved in resonance and polarization are not
    limited to radio propagation -- this is physics. I know that you
    know that.

    Richard
     
    Richard Steinfeld, Mar 5, 2005
    #13
  14. | I am a ham radio operator and the condition you are referring
    to is
    | "intermod|"
    |
    | I went to the local Hyundai dealer here in Mo. to talk to him
    about the
    | problem. His response was "Well no one listens to AM anyway and
    you can get
    | the local FM stations, can't you?" "That is all you need
    anyway"
    | I laughed at his apparent lack of knowlege about any type of
    radio
    | reception, and walked out.
    |
    | As an advocate of outside antennas for better reception from
    radios to
    | 2-way radios to cell phones, I believe that one area would
    probably fix a
    | majority of the difficulty. Just stepping out of a vehicle with
    a hanie
    | talkie can give a vhf signal as much as a 9db gain in signal
    strength.
    |

    Let me convert this a bit. 3 db represents a doubling of
    power/efficiency. The decibel scale is logarhythmic. In other
    words, 9dB doesn't sound like much, but I assure the reader that
    it's a huge improvement. Returning to the subject at hand: the
    window antenna. Going to a good vertical whip antenna should
    produce a very significant improvement in the radio's
    performance.

    I used to announce the optimum length of a radio whip antenna for
    FM reception when I was in radio; it was 31 or 32 inches (I've
    forgotten -- it was a long time ago). Perhaps "who" can give us a
    precise length.

    "Who," what do you think about my personal optimum antenna spot
    on a car: just next to the right rear corner of the roof?
    There's some reason why I don't think it's practical to put it in
    the middle of the roof, and I've forgotten my logic. It may have
    been that the vertical rear panel is stronger than the roof, and
    better in terms of water leaks and the car wash.

    Richard
     
    Richard Steinfeld, Mar 5, 2005
    #14
  15. rcpeters

    who Guest

    Richard, for the FM reception 30 inches should work quite well. I think
    most of the whips that are on cars now are about 30 inches. On reception ,
    it is not nearly as critical as it is on a transmitting antenna on the
    vehicle. The length of the antenna at 1/4 wavelength long is determined by
    the formula 234 divided by the frequency in MHZ. That will give you the
    length in feet and inches. The ideal place for a transmitting or receiving
    antenna in right in the middle of the vehicle's roof. This however is not
    practical. The reason for locating the antenna on the rear of the vehicle
    is to keep it as far as possible from the electrical charging system as
    possible to reduce interference from that scource.
    Now AM is a horse of a different color. The more whip, or "Ariel" as the
    old timers would call it, the better the reception. The older cars years
    ago had only AM radios and were equipped with telescoping antennas that
    pulled out to as much as 4 feet or even more.

    I was a ham since 1967 and back before cell phones handled a lot of
    military phone patches from Vietnam after the guys would get drunk,spend
    all their money, and forget to call mom. lol

    I gave Ham Radio up after it became a glorified CB band and they knocked
    off the requirment of Morse Code proficiency to obtain a liscense.

    Hams now can obtain a ticket by having a buddy give them the test and
    getting a liscense by that means. I got mine in front of an FCC examiner
    and had to drive 150 miles to K.C. Mo. to take the test three different
    times for higher class tickets.
     
    who, Mar 6, 2005
    #15
  16. I just remembered why I prefer the location of the car's right
    rear, just next to the roof:
    When parking, it's the highest place to put the antenna. In most
    of the world, people drive to the right side of the road. We
    typically park the car on the right side of the street.

    Whoops!
    I was wrong. Let's shift this thing to the _left_ rear corner. My
    reason was the least likely spot for the antenna to tangle with
    tree branches when parking. That would be on the left, not the
    right side.

    I had to visualize this, and it just came clear while writing.

    This position won't work with every car, of course. I last used
    it with a '62 SAAB sedan. I mounted the antenna on a removable
    cowl, which was pretty strong. I used a jury-rigged FM tuner
    board in a plastic box that I'd patched into the AM radio. It was
    important for me to have FM in the car so that I could listen to
    my station on my way in to work, and especially, to see if the
    person I was relieving was running the station on time or not and
    if there were any technical problems that I'd have to deal with
    on my shift. As soon as I could afford it, I replaced this setup
    with a Blaupunkt that delivered superb performance and cost quite
    a lot at the time.

    Richard
     
    Richard Steinfeld, Mar 6, 2005
    #16
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